We have got puppies!

Dogs are altri­cial spe­cies (the young are born before they are
fully deve­lop­ped). They need care from our side to survive. Offspring is
hel­pless and depen­dant on its parents. Pre­coc­cial spe­cies, in con­trast, such
as hor­ses geeses ect. are ready to eat, stand and walk on their own within
hours from
birth.

Cru­tial parts of pup­pies bodies are not even func­tio­nal when they are
born. Eyes and ears are unfor­med that light and sound could cause serious
damage to them. This is why they are clo­sed.
It will take mon­ths before they have the abi­li­ties that horse or geese
have from the begin­ning. That has a huge social signi­fi­cance as they start
wal­king from the birth, it is easy for
them to meet some­thing dan­ge­ro­use so they have to imprint on their mother
very quic­kly. They have to learn to fear
any­thing that is not her and distrust eve­ry­thing
they do not know. It is next to impos­si­ble to change that imprinting.

Altri­cial spe­cies howe­ver are under the care of their mother for the first
mon­ths so they do not deve­lop fear untill later.
Fear would be a use­less response as they can not fight or run away.
The­re­fore they have lon­ger and more fle­xi­ble
period in which they form social atta­che­ment and they become some­what
fle­xi­ble thru their lifes. Howe­ver
even at altri­cial spe­cies there is so cal­led cri­ti­cal socia­li­za­tion period
that ends
when ani­mal reaches his full abi­lity to run
away from the dan­ger. After that period they mistrust eve­ry­thing that
is new to them and this is very normal.

Taking the above under con­si­de­ra­tion it is impor­tant to start wor­king with
them from the very
beginning.

Filis pup­pies are won­der­ful to work with. They voca­lise a lot when they call
mother. It is a squ­eaky sound
cal­led an et-epidemilic sound that cau­ses others to care for them. Mother
can reco­gnize that sound. But what is inte­re­sting
– puppy can use the sound from the first minute he is born. Mother howe­ver
is able to reco­gnize that sound only after
majo­rity pup­pies are born…

Fili is a good mommy — she stais with them all the time, licks their bel­lies
(they can not defe­cate by them­se­lves yet so she
has to help them out by lic­king). She keeps her den clean. What they need
now is safety — warmth, food, quite a lot of rest and sleep.

Pup­pies have some­thing that I call navi­ga­tion sys­tem — rooting reflex that
helps them find their mother. It is heat seeking navi­ga­tion sys­tem.
Pup­pies have spe­cial heat sen­sors along their noastrils and when they want
to find their mother they move their head
in circ­les untill they find a heat source. When they find it they pull along
in that direction.

It is funny — but some­ti­mes they find me instead.

We feed Fili in the puppy pan so she does not have to come out too often.

Did you know that bit­ches milk pro­du­ces colo­strum? Pro­ba­bly yes. It is
colo­strum that will make the pup­pies resi­stant
from the dise­ases in the first weeks. So wha­te­ver Fili is resi­stant for,
pup­pies will also be resi­stant.
Pup­pies howe­ver are able to bene­fit from colo­strum only for the first 18
hours of life. Their inte­sti­nes are “ope­ned” and colo­strum mole­cu­les are
able to go thru the inte­sti­nes unbro­ken.
This way they go into the orga­nism
and they are able to boost the immune sys­tem. After that period it
is impos­si­ble any­more. So it is very impor­tant
that small pup­pies rece­ive the milk of a bitch within first 12–18 hours.

It looks really funny to watch them sleep because they twitch a lot. Parts
of
the bodies pop like a poop­corn.
It is nor­mal and very good for deve­lop­ment. This way they alre­ady exer­cise
their musc­les. It is cal­led acti­va­ted sleep
in which the brain gets elec­tri­cal stu­mu­la­tion and cau­ses the bodey to
twitch.

It is very impor­tant that now they start get­ting stress in appro­priate doses
so they grow to be sta­ble and well adju­sted
adults. But the key word here is APPROPRITE. So when they strug­gle to get
the boobie and they scream, we do not
pick them up, we do not help them. It is impor­tant that they do the job by
them­se­lves. And some­ti­mes I want to pick the
puppy up — it is my natu­ral motherly instinct of course…but each time I
have to remem­ber — they alre­ady learn now
it looks inno­cent but they learn good things .… Stres­sing neo­na­tes
very sli­gh­tly pro­du­ces very bene­fi­cial effects for them for the rest of
their lives.

What we do in that time — from day 3–16 is the Early Neu­ro­lo­gi­cal
stmu­la­tion. Car­men Bat­tal­gia sais “during neo­na­tal period if you sti­mu­late
neu­ro­lo­gi­cal sys­tem of a
puppy, you can change this puppy for the rest of his life”

There are 5 exer­ci­ses that you can do in that period but you sho­uld remem­ber
that each of them sho­uld not last more
than 5 seconds. Othe­rvise you will over­sti­mu­late the puppy.

The exer­ci­ses are:

1. Tac­tile sti­mu­la­tion (you tic­kle pup­pies feet
and it wakes up the neu­ro­lo­gi­cal sys­tem)
2. Put­ting puppy with its head up (now we are let­ting blood drain from his
brain and then­neu­ro­lo­gi­cal sys­tem would reco­gnize it and tell the heart
to pup the blood up to the brain main­ta­ining equ­ali­brio)
3. Put­ting puppy with its head down (too much blood is run­ning into the
brain, now we make the neu­ro­lo­gi­cal sys­tem work in a dif­fe­rent way because
we pre­sent dif­fe­rent
pro­blem)
4. Put­ting puppy on its back (most of them will resist being held on their
backs and the neu­ro­lo­gi­cal sys­tem again is being chal­len­ged)
5. Put­ting puppy on a cold towel (puppy will cle­arly tell you he does not
like it, but you are making the neu­ro­lo­gi­cal sys­tem respond
to a tem­pe­ra­ture change on a pup­pies bodies)

Such exer­ci­ses have the fol­lo­wing bene­fits:
Impro­ved car­dio vascu­lar per­for­mance (heart rate)
Stron­ger heart beats
Stron­ger adre­nal glands
More tole­rance to stress
Gre­ater resi­stance to disease

We always have to remem­ber: MORE IS NOT BETTER!!!

Australian Labradoodle puppies

Austra­lian Labra­do­odle puppies

Australian Labradoodle puppies

Austra­lian Labra­do­odle puppies

Australian Labradoodle puppies

Austra­lian Labra­do­odle puppies

Australian Labradoodle puppies

Austra­lian Labra­do­odle puppies

Australian Labradoodle puppies

Austra­lian Labra­do­odle puppies

Australian Labradoodle puppies

Austra­lian Labra­do­odle puppies

Australian Labradoodle puppies

Austra­lian Labra­do­odle puppies

Australian Labradoodle puppies

Austra­lian Labra­do­odle puppies

Fila

Fila

Fila

Fila

Week 2

It is us — pup­pies! We would like to tell you what was hap­pe­ning during this
week.
This week Edyta was con­ti­nu­ing Early Neu­ro­lo­gi­cal Sti­mu­la­tion.
We liked it, we did not object it too much. But Edyta is smart and she
always does it after feeding so she knows
we will be rela­xed;) She con­ti­nued that exer­cise with us till 16 day and she
stop­ped. Now she will have dif­fe­rent exer­cise
but .… about this we will tell you next week.

Some of us have ope­ned the eyes, but we still do not see. Gra­du­ally the
mem­brane that is on our eyes will fade
and we will see more and more every day…

Edyta lets us sniff to dif­fe­rent smells. Some of them we like, some of them
we do not like.

She sais we are very rela­xed, but so is our mommy. She sle­eps out­side the
den now but comes very often to feed us and
to lick us.

Labradoodle and smells

Labra­do­odle and smells

Labradoodle sleep

Labra­do­odle sleep

Labradoodle and guests

Labra­do­odle and guests

Labradoodle and smells

Labra­do­odle and smells

Week 3

The third week of pup­pies life is cal­led trans­i­tio­nal period. It is
appro­priate name because in a short week of life, puppy
trans­forms from a hel­pless cre­ature to a real puppy who can see, hear
tod­dle and play. We assign a time frame up to how old the puppy is but these
are really the ave­ra­ges that vary a lot. Scien­tist have tried to use
beha­vio­ural mar­kers to indi­cate the begin­ning and end of
these deve­lop­men­tal periods. This it is going to vary from a puppy to a
puppy. Not all the pup­pies deve­lop in the same time.
You sho­uld obse­rve the puppy to under­stand in which deve­lop­men­tal stage it
is.

In Filis lit­ter all pup­pies have ope­ned their eyes while one of them waited
for 4 more days.

Trans­i­tion period begins when eyes open and ends when they start hearing the
sound.
When pup­pies hear and see they can start deve­lo­ping social bonds and enter
into the next deve­lop­ment period which is a socia­li­sa­tion. Pup­pies start to
chew on
each other and play.

They also start to defe­cate by them­se­lves aro­und 16–17 days. It is
appro­xi­ma­tely the time when they start wal­king.
Then they walk away as they have a strong instinct to keep the puppy pan
clean.
Slowly the teeth start coming out so
the bitch does not want to stay with them all the time any­more. She gets
irri­ta­ted of pup­pies che­wing on her.
Thank­fully pup­pies start being inte­re­sted with their moms food then. They do
not under­stand how to eat yet.
They do not know that it is front of their bodies that eats so they get into
the bowl with their full bodies.
They are really exci­ted about their food but they do not know exac­tly what
do
do with it yet.

As neo­na­tes pup­pies have only one type of sound which was meant to
soli­ci­tate care. As they enter
trans­i­tio­nal period they start to deli­ver variety of mes­sa­ges
with voca­li­sa­tions, bar­king then deve­lops. Also non ver­bal com­mu­ni­ca­tion as
tail
wag­ging can also begin at this time.
By the end of that period pup­pies evo­lved from fra­gile exten­tions of their
mother to indi­vi­du­als with an emer­ging sence of self and capa­bi­li­ties
neces­se­sa­iry to
start the socia­li­za­tion process.

Labradoodle and Fabian

Labra­do­odle and Fabian

Labradoodle first food

Labra­do­odle first food

Labradoodles and other dogs

Labra­do­odles and other dogs

Labradoodle enriched environment

Labra­do­odle enri­ched environment

Labradoodle enriched environment

Labra­do­odle enri­ched environment

Week 4

Pup­pies get on their own feet now and they show big inte­rest in the out­side
world.
They start cha­sing and poun­cing more. The inte­rac­tion with their toys
evo­lves and they go from moun­ting to car­ry­ing and sha­king them. Scien­ti­fic
stu­dies have shown that phy­si­cal exer­cise is a key com­po­nent of the
enrich­ment effect.
Exer­cise is one of those things that cau­ses the brain to grow lar­ger and
form more neuro con­nec­tions.
Buil­ding a strong body does indeed mean buil­ding a strong mind. We take
them out to play in the living room and stre­atch their legs whe­ne­ver we
can.
They need to be in a lar­ger area than just a puppy pan. It
redu­ces ten­tion in the lit­ter. 4 week old pup­pies have no real fear -
they will appro­ach and inte­ract with any­thing you give them. So now it is
the time to intro­duce them to novel and chal­len­ging
thngs on a daily basis. The reason we do this is that adult dogs
instinc­ti­vely view new things with suspic­tion and possi­bly even agres­sion.
Howe­ver we can change this out­come for the pup­pies by inte­rve­ning now so
they learn to embrace new and chal­len­ging situ­ations as good things.
Chan­ging objects in a daily routine is impor­tant. Intro­du­cing other com­mon
mem­bers of the houshold as well.
A big pan full of toys is not eno­ugh for the pup­pies to bene­fit fully from
the enrich­ment effect. Scien­ti­fic stu­dies have shown that the most cri­ti­cal ele­ments of enri­ched envi­ron­ment are lear­ning and pro­blem solving. Ani­mals who are given lear­ning and pro­blem solving acti­vi­ties, in addi­tion to toys and social inte­rac­tion, grow up to be more stab­ble, less easily stres­sed, less easily
fri­gh­te­ned with bet­ter lear­ning and memory that ani­mals that are given the
same toys and social interc­tion, but no lear­ning and pro­blem solving actvi­ties. So it
is impor­tant to start pre­sen­ting pup­pies with chal­len­ges. They have to
climb out to get to some­thing, solve the pro­blem of how to get to the food by
them­se­lves. The rule is — NO HELPING THE PUPPIES! THEY HAVE TO SOLVE IT BY THEMSELVES.

There is always a puppy who does not want to do the work — he scre­ams, we can not help him out
he has to solve the pro­blem. Howe­ver we can enco­urage the puppy. If we help the puppy now -
scre­aming, bar­king and whi­ning gets results!!

If the puppy over­co­mes his fears and does this task, he will be gre­atly empo­we­red, more con­fi­dent and cal­mer in the future.
Pup­pies do not have a lot of use­ful vision at this stage so we have to set up chal­len­ges appro­pria­tely.
Visual and spa­cial chal­len­ges have to be set up very close to the puppy so he can find them. Bar­rier chal­len­ges are excel­lent. Low level pro­blem solving acti­vi­ties for pup­pies at this age:
– place the puppy behind the plate and let him figure the rest out.
When they master the bar­rier chal­lenge, you sho­uld incre­ase it. That ari­ses aro­usal level of the puppy. This is a great way to pre­sent mil­dly fru­stra­ting sce­na­rios to the puppy and
give him the tools to cope with those situ­ations by using his pro­blem solving skills. There is a the­ory that fru­stra­tion trig­gers most agres­sive beha­vio­urs. Neu­ro­lo­gi­cal stu­dies have shown that agres­sion and
fru­stra­tion ari­ses from the same cen­ters of the brain. Howe­ver teaching pup­pies to cope with fru­stra­tion now will reduce the chan­ces that they will become agres­sive in the future.

Week 5

Up till now we have been able to restore fear reco­very response without wor­ry­ing about true fear. As the puppy apro­aches 5 weeks howe­ver the game chan­ges. Pup­pies deve­lop true fear response and they can go thru
mild fear imprin­ting period, so more cau­tion is wanted.

Fear period is a par­ti­cu­lar sen­si­ti­vity period in which one sin­gle fri­gh­te­ning expe­rience can affect puppy for the rest of his life. We have to make sure our pup­pies get all the enri­ching expe­rien­ces
and as much expo­sure as possi­ble, but always make sure our pup­pies do not have really bad
experience.

So when the pup­pies begin 5 weeks they might start being afraid of some­thing
they have never been afraid of.
Some­ti­mes you can not be sure it really star­ted because it can go very quic­kly. What you have to realize is: even if you have wor­ked with the puppy a lot and con­di­tio­ned it so well that they bounce really quic­kly, the under­ly­ing pro­cess is still there — the puppy is in the sen­si­tive period aro­und this time.
So the thing is — you sho­uld pro­ce­ede socia­li­za­tion with more cau­tion that you were before.

Pup­pies sho­uld be still pla­ing with other mem­bers of the house­hold, but now as the pup­pies are more sen­si­tive to fear, in order to feel safe they need to feel they are in con­trol of the situ­ation. We sho­uld allow low pla­ces where pup­pies can escape from ove­ren­thu­sia­stic adults. When puppy reali­zes he can hide and come out whe­ne­ver he wants, his con­fi­dence will build quic­kly.
It is impor­tant to con­ti­nue sho­wing star­tling things on the daily basis to con­ti­nue teaching the pup­pies to reco­ver from fear.

Howe­ver at this stage you do not want to induce a high fear, a tiny star­tle is per­fect. If the puppy is not
reco­ve­ring almost imme­dia­tely, you need to take it back and pre­sent less
scary things. Keep pre­sen­ting scary things to him, but just not quite that scary. You want to see almost
imme­diate reco­very.
Also we have to give a fear­ful puppy tra­ining that will help him cope with
his fears. To do that we can use social inte­rac­tions — play­ing, pet­ting, pra­ising to rein­force dog tover­co­ming a scary object.

Pic­tu­res week 4 and 5

Labradoodle and different surfaces

Labra­do­odle and dif­fe­rent surfaces

Labradoodle and enriched environment

Labra­do­odle and enri­ched environment

Labradoodle and other dogs

Labra­do­odle and other dogs

Labradoodle soap bubbles

Labra­do­odle soap bubbles

Labradoodle soap bubbles

Labra­do­odle soap bubbles

Labradoodle first food

Labra­do­odle first food

Labradoodle and guests

Labra­do­odle and guests

Labradoodle and guests

Labra­do­odle and guests

Labradoodle and guests

Labra­do­odle and guests

Labradoodle and guests

Labra­do­odle and guests

Labradoodle playing

Labra­do­odle playing

Labradoodle and bench training

Labra­do­odle and bench training

Labradoodle and mixer

Labra­do­odle and mixer

Labradoodle playing outside

Labra­do­odle play­ing outside

Labradoodle playing outside

Labra­do­odle play­ing outside

Labradoodle playing outside

Labra­do­odle play­ing outside

Labradoodle problem solving

Labra­do­odle pro­blem solving

Labradoodle problem solving

Labra­do­odle pro­blem solving

Labradoodle puppies

Labra­do­odle puppies

Labradoodle and different surfaces

Labra­do­odle and dif­fe­rent surfaces

Labradoodle and vacum cleaner

Labra­do­odle and vacum cleaner

Labradoodle and baby

Labra­do­odle and baby

Labradoodle and baby

Labra­do­odle and baby

Labradoodle enriched environment

Labra­do­odle enri­ched environment

Week 6

At 6 weeks old the part of a puppy brain that does the reaso­ning is still
rela­ti­vely unfor­med. Even tough the tho­ught pro­cess is imma­ture the under­ly­ing stric­ture of its brain has almost adult com­pa­city to take the new infor­ma­tion and form the emo­tio­nal reac­tions to it. So in terms of being able to soke up new expe­rien­ces 6 weeks old pup­pies enter their peak socia­li­za­tion period -
they have the highest approah and lowest fear now. They still have very low
fear and high curio­sity this is why the stage is ref­fe­red to as curio­sity
period.
Now it is the time to intro­duce pup­pies to as many people as possi­ble.
Quality vs quan­tity is bet­ter — good expe­rien­ces are the most impor­tant as if some­thing hap­pens to them they may be sca­red for the rest of the life. (e.g.if some­body steps on a puppy). We show them agi­lity — but in fact we do not train them agi­lity — what we teach them to is to be good com­pa­nions. We let them walk on unsta­ble or wab­bly sur­fa­ces accept things that cover their heads ect. Equ­ip­ment has to be a lit­tle scary
so the pup­pies learn that maste­ring new skill in a chal­len­ging situ­ation is very rewar­ding. We expose pup­pies to dif­fe­rent people — strange people fri­gh­ten them as adults (glas­ses, hats, strange dress code -
police offi­cer, priest ect..)
. The pur­pose of the tra­ining is con­fi­dence buil­ding.
Puppy has to decide to use the equ­ip­ment in order to feel con­fi­dent. We sho­uld never force a puppy to do any­thing. We sho­uld not put him on the equ­ip­ment — he has to cho­ose by him­self. If we force him that will only cause fear and panic instead of con­fi­dence and con­trol. Ses­sions sho­uld be short. 6 minu­tes of a tra­ining is eno­ugh for a young puppy.

Labradoodle and agility

Labra­do­odle and agility

Labradoodle and enriched environment

Labra­do­odle and enri­ched environment

Labradoodle and enriched environment

Labra­do­odle and enri­ched environment

Labradoodle and enriched environment

Labra­do­odle and enri­ched environment

Labradoodle and enriched environment

Labra­do­odle and enri­ched environment

Labradoodle and enriched environment

Labra­do­odle and enri­ched environment

Labradoodle and enriched environment

Labra­do­odle and enri­ched environment

Labradoodle and grass cutter

Labra­do­odle and grass cutter

Labradoodle and other dogs

Labra­do­odle and other dogs

Labradoodle and guests

Labra­do­odle and guests

Labradoodle in the tent

Labra­do­odle in the tent

Labradoodle in a tunnel

Labra­do­odle in a tunnel

Labradoodle in a tunnel

Labra­do­odle in a tunnel

Labradoodle in a tunnel

Labra­do­odle in a tunnel

Labradoodle outside

Labra­do­odle outside

Labradoodle in a tent

Labra­do­odle in a tent

Labradoodle ride

Labra­do­odle ride

Labradoodle ride

Labra­do­odle ride

Labradoodle ride

Labra­do­odle ride

Labradoodle ride

Labra­do­odle ride

Labradoodle and agility

Labra­do­odle and agility

Labradoodle and agility

Labra­do­odle and agility

Labradoodle and agility

Labra­do­odle and agility

Labradoodle and agility

Labra­do­odle and agility

Labradoodle and agility

Labra­do­odle and agility

Labradoodle and agility

Labra­do­odle and agility

Labradoodle and grass cutter

Labra­do­odle and grass cutter

Labradoodle and enriched environment

Labra­do­odle and enri­ched environment

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